What Should I Eat?


The Hungry Heart helps you make better food choices

Putting the right fuel in your body helps keep you running at peak performance.

A ~ The basics of what we eat is disputed by many experts and specialists trying to promote their approach, their book, their diet, their research, etc.

If you go back to the basics of what truly healthy eating is without the gimmicks, fads, and quick fixes, in our informed opinion, it should be comprised of:

  • 60-65%  carbohydrates
  • 10-12% protein
  • 20-30% healthy fat.

To figure out how much of each type of food you should consume, let’s look at your basal metabolic rate (BMR)

Men: Body Weight (pounds) x 24/2.2

Women: Body Weight (pounds) x 21/2.2

An Example) A Female Weighs 150 pounds x 21 = 3150/2.2 = 1432 calories per day before any physical activity. So if you do physical exercise, move about the day taking care of daily life activities, lead a sedentary or active lifestyle, it will affect the amount of calories your body will burn off in addition on any given day.

Complex carbohydrates provide a sustained and gradual release of glucose into the bloodstream. Select foods such as pasta, bread, grains, and cereals. Complex carbohydrates should be the primary staple in your food consumption.

Fats do not aid in providing many vitamins, but 2 tablespoons a day will help your body absorb vitamins such as Vitamins A, D, E, and K. Recommended oils Omega Oils, Flaxseed Oil, Cod Liver Oil. Fish and Avocados can be great sources of fat.

Protein provides the structural basis for muscle tissue and supplies energy only when enough carbohydrates or fats aren’t present. Good sources of protein include legumes, meats, milk, and eggs.

Take a look at how much you are consuming on a day to day basis- and you can estimate if you think your body should be gaining weight, maintaining, or losing weight based on what you are doing. You can then determine how and what you should adjust.

If you need further assistance don’t hesitate to contact us.

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30 Healthy Snacks: Food & Diet


Craving salty?

  • 5 olives (any kind) (45 calories)
  • 1 small Martin’s pretzel (50 calories)
  • 2 oz Applegate Honey and Maple Turkey Breast wrapped around 2 bread-and-butter pickles (80 calories)
  • 1/4 cup hummus, 3 carrot sticks (80 calories)
  • 1 Laughing Cow Light Swiss Original wedge, 3 pieces Kavli Crispy Thin (85 calories)
  • One 1-oz package tuna jerky (90 calories)
  • 1 oz buffalo mozzarella, 1/2 cup cherry or grape tomatoes (94 calories)
  • 1 bag Baked! Cheetos 100 Calorie Mini Bites (100 calories)
  • 15 Eden’s Nori Maki Crackers rice crackers (110 calories)
  • 1 cup unshelled edamame (120 calories)
  • 50 Eden’s Vegetable Chips (130 calories)
  • One 1-oz package of Planters NUT-trition almonds (130 calories)
  • 1/4 cup Trader Joe’s Chili con Queso, 18 baked tortilla chips (140 calories)
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds in shell (143 calories)
  • 2 pieces (30 grams) prosciutto, 4 dried figs (154 calories)
  • 1 Subway Turkey Breast Wrap (190 calories)

Craving sweet?

  • 1 package Original Apple Nature Valley Fruit Crisps (50 calories)
  • 1 packet O’Coco’s Mocha cookies (90 calories)
  • 1 Jelly Belly 100-calorie pack (100 calories)
  • One 100-calorie pack Trader Joe’s Chocolate Graham Toucan Cookies (100 calories)
  • One 100-calorie Balance Bar (100 calories)
  • 1 Starbucks Mocha Frappuccino bar (120 calories)
  • 1 package Back to Nature Honey Graham Sticks (120 calories)
  • 1/2 banana rolled in 1 tbsp frozen semisweet chocolate chips (123 calories)
  • 2 tbsp Better ‘n Peanut Butter, 4 stalks celery (124 calories)
  • 1 bag Orville Redenbacher’s Smart Pop Butter Mini Bags topped with a spritz of butter spray and 1 tsp sugar (126 calories)
  • 24 Annie’s Chocolate Chip Bunny Graham cookies (140 calories)
  • Half of a 1.08-oz container of M&M’s Minis mixed with 1/3 cup lowfat granola (145 calories)
  • 1 McDonald’s Fruit ‘n Yogurt Parfait (160 calories)
  • 1 container Fage Greek Total 2% fat yogurt, 2 tsp honey (173 calories)

Excerpt: ‘Skinny Bitch in the Kitch’- on Meat


Meat
Hmm … dead, rotting, decomposing flesh of carcasses. Doesn’t sound like something you’d want to eat, huh? Not to mention the pesticides, hormones, steroids, and antibiotics. Oops! We almost forgot mad cow disease, bird flu, salmonella, E. coli, trichinosis, and mercury. Well, no wonder Americans are suffering from obesity; cancer; liver, kidney, lung, and reproductive disorders; birth defects; miscarriages; and nervous system disorders.

You can call it steak, tuna, bacon, or chicken. No matter how you slice it, it’s a piece of decaying, decomposing carcass. We know you like the taste, but there are other foods out there that mimic the flavor of meat but don’t come with the same side effects. Smarten up.

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